Gardening Equipment Retailers Richland WA

Local resource for gardening equipment retailers in Richland. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to gardening equipment, as well as advice and content on designing your own garden, the kind of tools you’ll need to do it, and whether an interior or exterior garden is right for you.

Heritage Landscaping & Nursery
(509) 586-0744
2816 W. 27th Ave.
Kennewick, WA
Blu LEDs, LLC - Buy LED Grow Lights
(949) 813-3096
1761 George Washington Way 382
Richland, WA
Products / Services
led grow lights, buy led grow lights, best led grow lights, grow lights, led horticulture lights

(360) 748-4221
PO Box 630 623 NW State Street
Chehalis , WA
Products / Services
Annuals, Bulbs, Chemicals, Crop Protection, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Groundcovers, Holiday Items, Horticulture Companies, Landscaping Services, Mulch, Perennials, Pest Control Supplies, Plants, Roses, Seeds, Shrubs, Soil & Amendments, Trees

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(206) 770-7879
3854 54th Ave SW
Seattle, WA

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Country Farm & Garden
(509) 575-8877
6 W Washington Ave
Yakima, WA
Products / Services
Annuals, Bulbs, Chemicals, Crop Protection, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Horticulture Companies, Mulch, Perennials, Pest Control Supplies, Plants, Roses, Seeds, Shrubs, Trees

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Basin Ornamental Iron
(509) 375-1115
2765 Einstein Ave
Richland, WA

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Flower Farm
(509) 547-8337
6724 W Court St
Pasco, WA

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Geranium Junction
(360) 636-2726
382 Diebert Rd
Longview, WA

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City People's Garden Store
(206) 324-0737
2939 E Madison St
Seattle, WA
Products / Services
Annuals, Aquatics, Arrangement Accessories, Bulbs, Ceramic, Terra Cotta & Stone Containers, Chemicals, Containers, Containers - Decorative, Crop Protection, Decorative Planters & Urns, Educational Books & Tapes, Ferns, Fertilizers, Furniture / Structures, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Gardening Tools, Gardening Supplies, Giftware, Groundcovers, Hand Tools, Herbs, Horticultural Programs, Horticulture Companies, Houseplants, Industry Supplies & Services…

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Swansons Nursery
(206) 782-2543
9701 15th Avenue NW
Seattle, WA
Products / Services
Annuals, Aquatics, Arbors / Arches, Arrangement Accessories, Bath & Personal Care Products, Benches / Chairs / Tables, Bird Baths, Bird Feeders, Bulbs, Cactus / Succulent, Cards & Envelopes, Ceramic, Terra Cotta & Stone Containers, Chemicals, Christmas Lighting, Christmas Ornaments & Decorations, Christmas Trees, Christmas Trees - Cut, Christmas Trees, Wreaths & Greens - Permanent, Clothing, Collectables & Figurines, Conifers / Evergreens, Container Plants, Containers, Containers - Decorative…

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Basic Rose Gardening Tips

It may be hard to believe, but summer officially starts June 21st. With your gardens and flowerbeds in order, it's time for maintenance, which usually includes keeping pests away from your plants, especially your prized roses.

I must confess, I am a rose lover, but sometimes the up-keep can seem like an impossible feat. Each rose comes with it's own unique beauty and problems. Too keep your roses in top shape, it's important to know the various problems that can wreak havoc and how to prevent future damage.

Black spots on leaves
Black Spot
Circular black spots with fringed edges on leaves. Initially may appear as yellowish spots.
Causes leaves to yellow. Lower leaves are affected first.
Remove infected leaves and pick up any leaves around rose. For roses already infected, spray Manzate or Mancozeb every 3 days for 3 intervals. For future prevention, spray with Funginex every 7 - 10 days.
Young canes are stunted and malformed. Powdery Mildew Fungal disease covering leaves, buds and stems with white powder spread by wind. Leaves curl and turn purple. Spray Benomyl or Funginex every seven to 10 days.
Underside of leaves have "blisters" or orange spots Rust Orange-red blisters that turn black in fall. Attacks new growth in spring. Is able to survive winter. Collect and discard infected leaves in fall. Spray Benomyl or Funginex every seven to 10 days.
Stunted or malformed foliage and blooms. Aphids Small soft-bodied green, brown or red insect clustered under leaves and flower buds Suck plant juices from tender new grown and buds. Spray with malathion or diazinon.
Mottled and weak leaves. Tiny white webs under leaves. Spider mites Tiny, green, red or yellow spiders on the underside of leaves. Suck juices from leaves. Apply Isotox or Orthene.
Flowers don't open or they open deformed. petals are flecked with brown. Thrips Slender, brown-yellow insects with fringed wings nesting in flower buds. Suck juices from flower buds. Cut and discard infested flowers. Apply malathion or Orthene in spring before buds have developed.
Canes are hollow or appear to be rotting. Cane-borers Insect and larvae difficult to spot as they live inside the rose cane. Check canes for external damage. Bore into cane and lay eggs. Larvae eat their way down through the cane. Cut cane off below the infection. Or prune back to expose wood. Seal wounds and entry points with nail polish, glue or prune compound.

Tips for Treatment Applications:

  • Spray or dust with fungicide every seven to 10 days throughout the growing season
  • Dust in the evening, or when wind is absent
  • Spray both the upper and lower surfaces of leaves with a fine mist
  • Apply pesticides early in the day to prevent the foliage from burning in high temperatur...

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Garden Design

Create You Dream Garden

To plan or not to plan
Experienced gardeners have no problem deciding when to plant their peas, how deep to put their tulip bulbs, or how much to water their geraniums. But when it comes to garden design, even the most seasoned gardeners begin to sweat. We can spend weeks trying to find the perfect spot for a new shrub; spend an entire winter sketching plans for a new perennial garden; and agonize for years about how to reconfigure the front walk. Why do we find these decisions so paralyzing?

One reason may be that garden design is perceived as the work of experts: landscape architects, landscape designers, garden designers, and landscape contractors. Yet some of the most beautiful gardens in the world were not designed by experts. Sissinghurst, the home and gardens of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, is a perfect example. So, too, are the gardens of Tasha Tudor and Thomas Jefferson. These gardens are the result of an attentive eye, a sensitive hand, and many years of experimentation - skills that are not the exclusive property of design professionals. Our goal in this article is to help you overcome the garden design jitters, and give you the confidence to finally remove that hedge of overgrown yews, install a flagstone path to your garden, or decide where to put a water garden.

Some gardeners wouldn't dream of planting anything without having a comprehensive design and planting plan for their entire yard. Others don't think about "designing" their gardens until several years down the road. And still other gardeners never develop a long-range or a short-range plan. They do their planning in the moment, poised with a shovel and a couple of homeless plants.

Which approach is right for you? It depends entirely on who you are and what you are comfortable with. If you have the confidence to forge ahead and follow your intuition, do so! If you feel the need to get some professional advice, then that's the best alternative for you. Both approaches are equally valid.

It is good to remember that there is no ultimate garden design for your property. There are as many different designs as there are gardeners. And even if you had a detailed plan that you executed to the "T", tomorrow would bring a new interest, a new challenge, and a whole new set of design decisions. The trees will mature and turn your sunny meadow into a shady glade. The weeping cherry that anchored your spring bulb garden will die and need to be replaced. You will tire of the cottage garden and develop a passion for dwarf conifers. In garden design there are no "right" decisions. It's a delightful (though sometimes unnerving) opportunity to express yourself. The hardest part may be trusting your own intuition, and allowing yourself to experiment as you evolve your own unique garden design.

The Site Plan
One of the most valuable design tools is a site plan, or bird's-eye vi...

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